Arts & Culture

Celebrate Human Rights Day at the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

Teaching moral and ethical responsibility to prejudice, hatred and indifference.

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Taylor Voth
Posted on Dec 8, 2020

Human Rights Day is celebrated every December 10 to honor the day, in 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, proclaiming the inalienable rights which everyone is entitled to as a human being.

Dedicated to teaching the history of the Holocaust and advancing human rights to combat prejudice, hatred and indifference, the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum is one piece of the Dallas experience that simply cannot be missed. The brand new, state-of-the-art museum offers unmatched educational and technological opportunities, revealing the experiences and stories of Dallas-area Holocaust survivors, as well exploring the ten stages of genocide and the development of human and civil rights around the world.

Located in Dallas' West End, the DHHRM opened its doors to its new facility in September of 2019. The 55,000-square-foot Museum's three floors includes a 250-seat theatre with cutting edge technology, two classrooms, a library and archives, as well as a memorial and reflection room. Housing both permanent and rotating exhibitions, the museum focuses not only on the historical implications of the Holocaust, but is also dedicated to preserving the accounts and testimonies of Holocaust survivors, exploring the impact of other genocides around the world, human rights, and the fight for civil rights in the United States.

While there are 21 Holocaust-related museums across the country, the DHHRM is unique among its counterparts. Its commitment to expanding its examination of the Holocaust through the video testimonies of 68 Dallas-area survivors and its focus on pursuing the latest in technology and education creates a one-of-a-kind experience for all who visit.

From the historical impact of the Holocaust etched across every wall and the emotionally gripping experience of stepping inside a WWII boxcar, to the examination of genocides around the world and the focus on the civil rights movement across the United States and Texas, the DHHRM has created a learning environment that is profound in its ability to intimately acquaint visitors with the past and simultaneously point to the imperative relevance of those experiences today. The Tolerance Theatre, an interactive space where visitors can explore their own hidden biases and consider their responses to them, is an especially poignant experience.

One of the most exciting pieces of technology at work is the addition of the Dimensions in Testimony theatre. Combining high-definition recording, voice activation and holographic imagery, visitors can now experience 3-D interaction with Holocaust survivors and are able to ask them questions, hear responses and learn from their stories in real time. This immersive and interactive programming guarantees that the stories and experiences of Holocaust survivors will be available for future generations to come.

The Museum offers a wide array of new and exciting content as well. From rotating exhibitions, guest speakers and film screenings, there is always something new to experience at the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum. The current special exhibition is 'The Fight for Civil Rights in the South' which combines two prestigious photography exhibitions covering the African American struggle for civil rights and social equality in the 1960s, is on display until May 31, 2021.

The Museum is currently operating at 25 percent capacity and requires that time-slot tickets be booked in advance online at DHHRM.org in order to adhere to current COVID protocol. Masks and social distancing are required to enjoy the museum, and every measure and precaution are being taken to ensure the health and safety of each guest.

Header photo credit: Jason O'Rear Photography