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Harwood District Spotlight

The Harwood District brings the best of the world to its Dallas neighbors.

Posted on May 18, 2021 By Jennifer Simonson

The 19-city block Harwood District is a self-contained, uber-walkable neighborhood on the north end of Downtown Dallas. The district between Uptown and Victory Park was first developed with the Rolex building in 1984. Since then, it has blossomed to include luxury office buildings, outdoor pocket gardens, high rise residents and trendy restaurants. Tons of trendy restaurants.

For a neighborhood smack-dab in the middle of a Texas city, the Harwood District brings the world to its residents and visitors. Spend the day here exploring the tastes and cultures of Japan, France, England, Peru and more with these five activities.

Get in touch with your inner Samurai
The Harwood District is home to one of the largest samurai art and armor collections in the world. The Ann & Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Museum showcases nearly 300 objects dating from the seventh to nineteenth centuries including, suits of samurai armor, helmets, masks, and weapons are a part of the permanent collection. While its newest exhibition, IRON MEN: The Artistry of Iron in Samurai Armor, explores the role iron played in Japanese warrior technology and culture. The Samurai Collection's touring exhibition, SAMURAI, traces the evolution of the functionality that characterized Japanese warriors on the battlefield. 

The Barbier-Mueller Museum is the only museum in the United States dedicated to ancient Japanese military warriors. The free museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. 

Brunch at Saint Ann Restaurant and Bar
Dallasites consistently rate the oversized garden patio at this 1920s landmark building as one of the best in the entire city. In fact, some give it credit for helping pave the way for the patio revolution in Dallas.

But it is not all about the patio here, the food is Saint Ann Restaurant and Bar's main draw. Chef Taylor Kearney has created an outstanding menu by combining the Pacific Northwest philosophy of using local ingredients with local ingredients. The result? A seasonal menu with many of the ingredients grown on farms within a 50-mile radius. The menu items not to miss are Texas wagyu tartare, mushroom toast, and the chicken biscuit with honey butter and fried egg.

Drink a pint at Harwood Arms
Craving a trip across the pond but don't have the time? Stop by this traditional English pub for the next best thing. It is not just pints of Guinness and baskets of fish and chips (though they are very popular here) at Harwood Arms; the pub menu is stocked full of hearty options such as creamy beer cheese soup, London broil steaks and the very traditional bangers & mash.

If you are just there for a drink, you can choose between more than 50 beers, 40 whiskeys and a handful of cleverly crafted cocktails. The leather-covered benches, dark wood paneling and cozy booths will make the pub a popular hangout in the summer when Texans are wanting to escape from the unrelenting hot sun.

Sip Champagne at Mercat Bistro
Francophiles looking for a French fix can stop by this little bistro for a croissant, coq au vin or creme brulee. The classic Parisian bistro is open for brunch, lunch, and dinner. While you are there, make sure to order the signature Peche Mignon - a rosé poured over a melting ice ball of fresh fruits, or the La Vie En Rose - a bubbly drink with St. Germain, lillet, fresh lime and raspberries. Grab a seat on the shaded patio, order a second glass of Champagne and enjoy people watching on the busy Uptown street.

Learn how to Salsa
Why choose food from just one country when you can sample an entire continent? The seafood heavy menu at Te Deseo features cuisines from Peru, Mexico, Argentina, and Brazil. Think Peruvian-style sashimi, Chilean sea bass, and Mexican shrimp tacos. No Latin American restaurant would be complete without an extensive list of tequilas and mezcals. With more than 100 bottles of the popular spirits, Te Deseo checks that box.

The 14,000-square-foot restaurant includes a tiled courtyard, four bars (yes, four) and a rooftop patio that overlooks the city. The restaurant also regularly hosts salsa lessons, while Live DJs spin the best salsa, cumbia and reggaeton in the background.

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